On Their Travels Again

In the years after World War II, Italians started to leave again with the help of international agreements- labour and know-how in return for raw materials - for European countries, Argentina and Australia.

Once again, they had to pay a heavy toll: in Marcinelle, Belgium, for example, 237 men died in a mining accident in August 1956. Of the victims, 139 were Italian.

The flow stopped in the seventies.

The Ministry for Foreign Affairs estimated that in 1994, there were over 58 million people of Italian origin living in various parts of the world - the equivalent of the population of Italy.

Miners. Mining was the most punishing job done by Italians who emigrated from the end of World War II until the mid-seventies,  when the exodus finally ended. And it was also the job for which Italians paid the highest price in terms of casualties and permanent disability
Miners. Mining was the most punishing job done by Italians who emigrated from the end of World War II until the mid-seventies, when the exodus finally ended. And it was also the job for which Italians paid the highest price in terms of casualties and permanent disability
The “Manualetto di conversazione per il lavoratore italiano in Svizzera” (Little Conversation Handbook for Italian Workers in Switzerland) was published by the Banca Nazionale del Lavoro (National Work Bank) which, in the late 1930s, activated a remittance service from abroad “in real time”, allowing rapid transfer of funds to emigrants’ families in Italy
The “Manualetto di conversazione per il lavoratore italiano in Svizzera” (Little Conversation Handbook for Italian Workers in Switzerland) was published by the Banca Nazionale del Lavoro (National Work Bank) which, in the late 1930s, activated a remittance service from abroad “in real time”, allowing rapid transfer of funds to emigrants’ families in Italy